Artist
Stats
The Arcade Fire
Astrud Gilberto
Atmosphere
The Beach Boys
The Beatles
Ben Harper
Better Than Ezra
Bicycle
Bill Evans
Binary Star
Black Sabbath
Bob Dylan
Bob Marley & The Wailers
Bonnie 'Prince' Billy
Brendan Benson
Bright Eyes
Brother Ali
Built to Spill
Chamillionaire
Citizen Cope
Clap Your Hands Say Yeah!
Coheed and Cambria
Coldplay
Company Flow
Daft Punk
Damien Rice
Dane Cook
Death Cab for Cutie
The Decemberists
The Dismemberment Plan
Disturbed
DJ Shadow
Don Caballero
Doug Martsch
Duke Ellington With Charles Mingus & Max Roach
The Eagles
Edan
Elliot Smith
Elton John
Elvis Costello
Eminem
Eric Clapton
Eve 6
Everlast
Explosions In The Sky
Fabolous
Fatboy Slim
The Flaming Lips
Foo Fighters
Frank Sinatra and Count Basie Orchestra
Freddie Hubbard
The Game
Gnarls Barkley
Goo Goo Dolls
Good Charlotte
Gorillaz
Green Day
Harry Connick Jr
Heatmiser
Herbie Hancock
Hinder
Hootie & The Blowfish
Incubus
Insane Clown Posse
Jack Johnson
Jadakiss
Jay-Z
Jedi Mind Tricks
Jenny Lewis
John Mayer
Johnny Sketch And The Dirty Notes
Kanye West
Led Zeppelin
Lemon Jelly
Lifehouse
Lil' Wayne
Lil' Wyte
Linkin Park
Living Legends
Ludacris
Magnetic Fields
Maroon 5
Massive Attack
Matchbox 20
Mercury Rev
Michael Jackson
Miles Davis
Mindless Self Indulgence
Modest Mouse
Mos Def
My Bloody Valentine
Nas
Necro
Neutral Milk Hotel
Nico
Nightwish
Of Montreal
The Olivia Tremor Control
Outkast
Pink Floyd
Pixies
The Polyphonic Spree
Pumpkinhead
R.E.M.
Radiohead
Ray Charles
The Red Hot Chili Peppers
Rilo Kiley
The Rolling Stones
Sean Price
Semisonic
The Shins
Sigur Rós
Slowblow
The Smashing Pumpkins
Something Corporate
Soulja Slim
Sparklehorse
Stephen Malkmus
Sting
The Streets
Sublime
Survivor
Talib Kweli
Tortoise
Train
Tupac
Various Artists
The Walkmen
Weezer
Weird Al Yankovic
Wilco
The Wrens
Yo La Tengo
Young Buck
Zion I
ZZ Top
Artist: The Beatles
Label: Capitol
Genre: Pop
Release: Nov 2000   My Rating: 0
Duration: 78:57
Summary: Proving yet again their willingness to dice 'n' slice their burgeoning legacy into new--if not exactly fresh--product, the Fab Four Minus One have released this single-disc compendium of their No. 1 hits. Though obviously superfluous to the faithful (who may also find themselves quibbling over the precise definition of "No. 1 hit" and the exclusion of seeming contenders like "Please Please Me" and "Strawberry Fields"), newly arrived visitors from the Pleiades star cluster and other neophytes will find it a concise and generous (nearly 80 minutes) single-disc introduction to the band's career-spanning, unparalleled dominance of pop music in the 1960s. But beyond being a mere trophy case of commercial success (and it won't be hard to find critics who'll argue that these singles aren't even the band's best work), it's also a "Cliff's Notes" take on a remarkable seven-year run of musical evolution, one that stretches from the neo-skiffle of "Love Me Do" through a remarkable synthesis of R&B, rockabilly, Tin Pan Alley, gospel, country, and classical that still defies efforts to effectively deconstruct it. This is the pop monument equivalent of the '27 Yankees and '90s Bulls; it's every bit as obvious and dominating--and just as essential. "--Jerry McCulley"


Artist: The Beatles
Label: Capitol
Genre: Pop
Release: Oct 1990   My Rating: 0
Duration: 44:08
Summary: The Beatles' last days as a band were as productive as any major pop phenomenon that was about to split. After recording the ragged-but-right "Let It Be", the group held on for this ambitious effort, an album that was to become their best-selling. Though all four contribute to the first side's writing, John Lennon's hard-rocking, "Come Together" and "I Want You (She's So Heavy)" make the strongest impression. A series of song fragments edited together in suite form dominates side two; its portentous, touching, official close ("Golden Slumbers"/"Carry That Weight"/"The End") is nicely undercut, in typical Beatles fashion, by Paul McCartney's cheeky "Her Majesty," which follows. "--Rickey Wright"


Artist: The Beatles
Label: Capitol
Genre: Pop
Release: Oct 1990   My Rating: 0
Duration: 34:06
Summary: Banged out in a hurry for the 1964 Christmas market, "Beatles for Sale" sometimes sounds it, loaded with ill-conceived covers and some of John Lennon's most self-loathing lyrics. On the other hand, the people doing the banging-out were the Beatles, whose instincts for what worked musically were so strong that they could basically do no wrong--any record that has "Baby's in Black," "I Don't Want to Spoil the Party" and the delectable "Eight Days a Week" on it is only "minor" in the most relative sense. And, though their voices had been frazzled a bit by constant touring, they revved them up for some joyous shouting, and indulged their fondness for American country in subtle, playful ways. "--Douglas Wolk"


Artist: The Beatles
Label: Capitol
Genre: Pop
Release: Oct 1990   My Rating: 0
Duration: 30:24
Summary: "Strummmmm!" That dramatic guitar chord that kicks of "A Hard Day's Night" (album, song, movie) still jumps right out at you, slaps you in the face, and jump-starts your heart. And you know what? Both the music "and" the film are still as crisp and lively as they were in 1964. Of course, only the first seven songs are actually in the movie (and they are the strongest of the bunch, from the rousing rock & roll of the title track and the hit single "Can't Buy Me Love," to the beautiful ballads "If I Fell" and "And I Love Her"). But nobody's going to complain about having songs like "I'll Cry Instead" and "Things We Said Today" in the second half of the record; they sure don't "feel" like leftovers. Yet another high-point for John, Paul, George, and Ringo--four fab fellows who hit the highest heights imaginable. "--Jim Emerson"


Artist: The Beatles
Label: Capitol
Genre: Pop
Release: Oct 1990   My Rating: 0
Duration: 34:15
Summary: How John Lennon's confessional song became the title for a silly James Bond spoof I really don't know. The funny thing is, it works both ways--as a young man's personal statement about learning to open up to others, and as the frantic theme for an exotic espionage chase comedy starring those lovable mop-tops (this time in "color"). Like "A Hard Day's Night", only the first "side" of this album actually contains songs from the movie--the biggest hits being the eponymous cry for assistance and "Ticket to Ride." But part 2 has a few nice tunes as well, like "It's Only Love," "I've Just Seen a Face," and a little ditty called "Yesterday." And I always love it when they do an all-out screamer like "Dizzy Miss Lizzy," which sounds like John's raucous answer to Paul's "Kansas City/Hey, Hey, Hey, Hey" vocal on "Beatles for Sale". Of course, it's essential--as are all the Beatles' soundtracks (all the Beatles' "albums"), with the possible exception of "Yellow Submarine". "--Jim Emerson"


Artist: The Beatles
Label: Capitol
Genre: Pop
Release: Oct 1990   My Rating: 0
Duration: 37:49
Summary: Sloppy in conception, and even sometimes in the playing, "Let It Be" often gets a bad rap. Unfairly, as it's often as charming, well written, and (oh yeah) rocking as the Beatles' "better" albums; it's also more outright fun than "Abbey Road", the masterpiece it followed into the stores. With Lennon and McCartney working together on the perfect "I've Got a Feeling," "Two of Us," and "Dig a Pony," it's hard to believe these guys were about to implode. "--Rickey Wright"


Artist: The Beatles
Label: Capitol
Genre: Pop
Release: Nov 2003   My Rating: 0
Duration: 56:56
Summary: Re-recorded, remixed, overdubbed and repackaged--all "before" its 1970 American release, mind you--"Let It Be" has long been the most second-guessed album in the Beatles otherwise sterling catalog. This curious, three-decade-late, stripped-down rethink offers up yet another spin on what started as a back-to-the-roots album/documentary project called "Get Back" in January, 1969, but ended up as the band's "de facto" swan song 18 months later. Paul McCartney in particular has long been irked by producer Phil Spector's grandiose orchestra and choir overdubs to the title track and "The Long and Winding Road," and indeed the "bare" versions here have a distinct, plaintive charm lacking in Spector's typical pomp. All the various snippets of studio and live chatter that seasoned the original have been removed, leaving the recordings to be judged on their essentially live-in-the-studio merits. If the intent was to "de-Spectorize" the album, the inclusion of John Lennon's 1968 benefit track "Across the Universe" and George Harrison's "I Me Mine" (which marked the last-ever Beatles session in January, 1970) in their original versions seems equally odd, the legendary producer having appended them to the album's original track listing in the first place. The rambling "bonus disc" of conversation and song snippets culled from hundreds of hours of session and film tapes may fascinate diehard fans, but it also underscores the murky, often unfocused state of affairs the Fabs found themselves in during the last year of their remarkable career. "--Jerry McCulley"


Artist: The Beatles
Label: Capitol
Genre: Pop
Release: Oct 1990   My Rating: 0
Duration: 36:44
Summary: The album feels even more like a collection of singles (instead of an actual movie soundtrack) than "Help!" or "A Hard Day's Night", but maybe that's because every song sounds like it could have been a hit single--with the natural exception of the goofy/weird instrumental "Flying." Even George's "Blue Jay Way" paints a vivid sound-portrait in fascinating detail. (I consider Joni Mitchell's "Car on the Hill" from "Court and Spark" to be a companion piece about sitting in the Hollywood Hills, waiting for somebody to show up.) And although the goofy TV movie may have been mostly Paul's baby, this album features the two 45 rpm masterpieces that sum up the quintessential best of Lennon "and" McCartney at this stage of their development: Paul's "Penny Lane" and John's "I Am the Walrus." "--Jim Emerson"


Artist: The Beatles
Label: Capitol
Genre: Pop
Release: Oct 1990   My Rating: 0
Duration: 42:18
Summary: Although they were probably the band that most transformed rock from a singles medium to an album-oriented form, the Beatles also released many singles and EP tracks that never made it onto albums. In the U.S., Capitol turned the group's early LPs, through Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band, into compilations, more or less, throwing the hit singles onto the vinyl to augment the album tracks. When the label later released the U.K. albums on CD, it posed a problem: What to do with the non-LP singles? "Past Masters, Volume 1" compiles 18 of those singles, including some of their best-known tracks, running from "Love Me Do," "She Love You," "I Want to Hold Your Hand," and "This Boy" to "I Feel Fine" and Paul's homage to Little Richard, "I'm Down." Essential stuff. "--Bill Holdship"


Artist: The Beatles
Label: Capitol
Genre: Pop
Release: Oct 1990   My Rating: 0
Duration: 50:54
Summary: What can you say, really? When you get right down to it, it's the greatest band in the history of pop music, the most influential, the best writers, and whatever other superlatives you can think of. Given their phenomenal output, and their huge chart success, it's no surprise that this second volume proves every bit as rich as the first. John, Paul, George, and Ringo had that rare chemistry that moved musical mountains, with more great songs than many people have had hot dinners, and they're still affecting the course of popular music. Thirty years later, all the paths they hinted at have yet to be explored, which is about as high a testament as can be given. "--Chris Nickson"


Artist: The Beatles
Label: Capitol
Genre: Pop
Release: Oct 1990   My Rating: 0
Duration: 32:39
Summary: Their first-ever album, raw and rough and still very rock & roll. Lennon and McCartney begin to flex their writing muscles and had already scored two UK hits when this appeared, but they still relied heavily on the cover material to see them through. Their insecurity about their own abilities seems curious in hindsight since they'd pulled the title song and "I Saw Her Standing There" (with thanks to Little Richard) out of their hats. But they were an unknown quantity, still to launch a million bands and take pop music to places it had never dreamed off. A small step for four men, a giant leap for music. "--Chris Nickson"


Artist: The Beatles
Label: Capitol
Genre: Pop
Release: Oct 1990   My Rating: 0
Duration: 34:52
Summary: "Revolver" wouldn't remain the Beatles' most ambitious LP for long, but many fans--including this one--remember it as their best. An object lesson in fitting great songwriting into experimental production and genre play, this is also a record whose influence extends far beyond mere they-was-the-greatest cheerleading. Putting McCartney's more traditionally melodic "Here, There and Everywhere" and "For No One" alongside Lennon's direct-hit sneering ("Dr. Robert") and dreamscapes ("I'm Only Sleeping," "Tomorrow Never Knows") and Harrison's peaking wit ("Taxman") was as conceptually brilliant as anything "Sgt. Pepper" attempted, and more subtly fulfilling. A must. "--Rickey Wright"


Artist: The Beatles
Label: Capitol
Genre: Pop
Release: Oct 1990   My Rating: 0
Duration: 35:38
Summary: Rank 'em how you like, "Rubber Soul" is an undeniable pivot point in the Fab Four's varied discography no matter where, or how, you first heard it. The album was softened up in its original 12-song American edition to jibe with the Dylan/Byrds folk-rock sound, as well as squeeze money from the Parlophone catalog. The 14-song U.K. edition--the version now available on compact disc--is a different, more dynamic, and ultimately more accomplished achievement. So many classics: "Drive My Car" and "Nowhere Man" (both omitted from the U.S. edition) merge the early combustible Beatifics to a burgeoning studio consciousness; "The Word" can be read as a pre-psych warning shot; the sitar-laden "Norwegian Wood" and the evocative "Girl" (the latter written on the last night of the sessions) stand as turning points in John Lennon's oeuvre. George finally emerges too, with the McGuinn-ish "If I Needed Someone." "--Don Harrison"


Artist: The Beatles
Label: Capitol
Genre: Pop
Release: Jul 2002   My Rating: 0
Duration: 38:28
Summary: Before "Sgt. Pepper", no one seriously thought of rock music as actual art. That all changed in 1967, though, when John, Paul, George and Ringo (with "A Little Help" from their friend, producer George Martin) created an undeniable work of art which remains, after 30-plus years, one of the most influential albums of all time. From Lennon's evocative word/sound pictures (the trippy "Lucy in the Sky With Diamonds," the carnival-like "Being for the Benefit of Mr. Kite") and McCartney's music hall-styled "When I'm 64," to Harrison's Eastern-leaning "Within You Without You," and the avant-garde mini-suite, "A Day in the Life," "Sgt. Pepper" was a milestone for both '60s music and popular culture. "--Billy Altman"


Artist: The Beatles
Label: Capitol
Genre: Pop
Release: Jan 1968   My Rating: 0
Duration: 46:32
Summary: Better known as the "White Album," this was meant to be the record that brought them back to earth after three years of studio experimentation. Instead, it took them all over the place, continuing to burst the envelope of pop music. Lennon and McCartney were still at the height of their powers, with Lennon in particular growing into one of rock's towering figures. But even McCartney could still rock, and the amazement on "Helter Skelter" was that he had vocal cords at the end. From Beach Boys knock-offs to reggae and to the unknown ("Revolution #9"), this has it all. Some records have "legend" written all over them; this is one. "--Chris Nickson"


Artist: The Beatles
Label: Capitol
Genre: Pop
Release: Oct 1990   My Rating: 0
Duration: 33:17
Summary: They still had plenty of covers to fill out the running time, but the Lennon-McCartney writing team was gathering steam and beginning to knock out pop classics as if they were pulling them out of thin air. "All My Loving" and "I Wanna Be your Man" come from this record, issued hurriedly to capitalize on English Beatlemania. But even when they were laying into some classic Chuck Berry, by this time the Beatles had acquired a unique sound in the blend of John's and Paul's voices, while George was coming on by leaps and bounds as a guitar player. While not absolutely essential, as a snapshot of a band in a place and time, "With the Beatles" is good for a smile. "--Chris Nickson"


Artist: The Beatles
Label: Capitol
Genre: Pop
Release: Sep 1999   My Rating: 0
Duration: 40:06
Summary: To the horror of their most obsessive fans, the surviving Beatles have proven more than willing to tamper with their pop legacy, as witnessed by the various facets of their massive, occasionally myopic mid-1990s "Anthology" projects (and the suspect notion of its faux techno-marvel "reunions"). In boldly revamping the soundtrack to their 1968 Heinz Edelmann-designed animated fable "Yellow Submarine", the Fabs have shown they're not immune to the irony of the age either: their original involvement in the project was both tentative and minimal. This new version completely excises Beatles-producer Sir George Martin's charming, if sometimes maudlin, orchestral score, offering instead a new "songtrack" containing all the Beatles songs (standout cuts from "Rubber Soul", "Revolver", and "Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band", in addition to the four originals unique to the project) featured in the film. The pre-announced "unreleased song" on the set turns out to be the original album's rollicking "Hey Bulldog", one of the last true Lennon-McCartney collaborations. "Hey Bulldog" was also the subject of both a previously excised sequence in the film and a newly edited in-studio video cobbled together from footage shot in early 1968 and previously used in vintage promos for "Lady Madonna". Though it may further upset purists, the band has allowed these tracks to be digitally remixed and remastered into 5.1 surround sound, imparting both a stunning clarity and a new perspective (as well as restoring a "missing" verse and the original six-minute plus playing time to "It's All Too Much") on some of the greatest--if obviously overexposed--songs and recordings in the history of rock. "--Jerry McCulley"