Artist
Stats
The Arcade Fire
Astrud Gilberto
Atmosphere
The Beach Boys
The Beatles
Ben Harper
Better Than Ezra
Bicycle
Bill Evans
Binary Star
Black Sabbath
Bob Dylan
Bob Marley & The Wailers
Bonnie 'Prince' Billy
Brendan Benson
Bright Eyes
Brother Ali
Built to Spill
Chamillionaire
Citizen Cope
Clap Your Hands Say Yeah!
Coheed and Cambria
Coldplay
Company Flow
Daft Punk
Damien Rice
Dane Cook
Death Cab for Cutie
The Decemberists
The Dismemberment Plan
Disturbed
DJ Shadow
Don Caballero
Doug Martsch
Duke Ellington With Charles Mingus & Max Roach
The Eagles
Edan
Elliot Smith
Elton John
Elvis Costello
Eminem
Eric Clapton
Eve 6
Everlast
Explosions In The Sky
Fabolous
Fatboy Slim
The Flaming Lips
Foo Fighters
Frank Sinatra and Count Basie Orchestra
Freddie Hubbard
The Game
Gnarls Barkley
Goo Goo Dolls
Good Charlotte
Gorillaz
Green Day
Harry Connick Jr
Heatmiser
Herbie Hancock
Hinder
Hootie & The Blowfish
Incubus
Insane Clown Posse
Jack Johnson
Jadakiss
Jay-Z
Jedi Mind Tricks
Jenny Lewis
John Mayer
Johnny Sketch And The Dirty Notes
Kanye West
Led Zeppelin
Lemon Jelly
Lifehouse
Lil' Wayne
Lil' Wyte
Linkin Park
Living Legends
Ludacris
Magnetic Fields
Maroon 5
Massive Attack
Matchbox 20
Mercury Rev
Michael Jackson
Miles Davis
Mindless Self Indulgence
Modest Mouse
Mos Def
My Bloody Valentine
Nas
Necro
Neutral Milk Hotel
Nico
Nightwish
Of Montreal
The Olivia Tremor Control
Outkast
Pink Floyd
Pixies
The Polyphonic Spree
Pumpkinhead
R.E.M.
Radiohead
Ray Charles
The Red Hot Chili Peppers
Rilo Kiley
The Rolling Stones
Sean Price
Semisonic
The Shins
Sigur Rós
Slowblow
The Smashing Pumpkins
Something Corporate
Soulja Slim
Sparklehorse
Stephen Malkmus
Sting
The Streets
Sublime
Survivor
Talib Kweli
Tortoise
Train
Tupac
Various Artists
The Walkmen
Weezer
Weird Al Yankovic
Wilco
The Wrens
Yo La Tengo
Young Buck
Zion I
ZZ Top
Artist: The Flaming Lips
Label: Warner Bros / Wea
Genre: Alternative & Punk
Release: Jan 2005   My Rating: 0
Duration: 54:55
Summary: After two expansive yet winsome epic albums like " The Soft Bulletin" and "Yoshimi Battles the Pink Robots" that dealt with the inevitability of death in the face of life, the Oklahoma City art provocateurs have abandoned the concept album approach and done an about face. They've returned to their earlier canon, channeling their messy psychedelica through a 70s funk scrim, and yet again figured out a way to elevate the ordinary to the sublime--even out-weirding Syd Barrett-era Pink Floyd on a track like "Pompeii," and precariously balancing out on the astral plane on "Wizard Turns On." And while you might be tempted to believe that this band is just about their cartoonish space bubbles on pink rabbits, it is at your own peril. "At War With the Mystics" is an intelligent and searing indictment of George W. Bush, his administration, suicide bombers, superficiality and undeserved stardom--branding them all sinners of similar stripe. A song like "Sound of Failure/It's Dark...Is it Always This Dark?" boldly calls out pop culture princesses Gwen Stefani and Britney Spears, but not without first giving them a wet kiss goodnight. "Free Radicals" is a precious soul romp that sounds like Prince in his prime, but instead was oddly inspired by a dream about Devendra Banhart, and is an sharp arrow aimed straight at the heart of would-be terrorists. Major domo and head Lip Wayne Coyne is a shrewd observer of human nature, and an even shrewder songwriter and this album stands as his greatest and most varied work yet. "--Jaan Uhelszki"


Artist: The Flaming Lips
Label: Warner Bros / Wea
Genre: Other
Release: Jan 1999   My Rating: 0
Duration: 58:22
Summary: The crazed genius of the Lips comes to full flower on the sonically massive and majestic "The Soft Bulletin". Head Lip Wayne Coyne compounds the band's penchant for psychedelic freak-outs with a symphonic extravaganza. The result is nothing short of magnificent, not only the best rock album of the year, but among the best recordings of the decade. In 30 years, your grandkids are going to think you're pretty damned cool for having "The Soft Bulletin" in your collection. "--Tod Nelson"


Artist: The Flaming Lips
Label: Warner Bros / Wea
Genre: Rock/Pop
Release: Jan 1993   My Rating: 0
Duration: 43:00
Summary: Sometimes it seems as if there's every other band in America, and then there's the Flaming Lips. The Norman, Oklahoma, quartet makes modern rock that doesn't sound like anyone else; head music, they'd have called it in psychedelia's heyday, weird soundscapes that conjure the bizarre alternate universe on the other side of the funhouse mirror. "Transmissions", their second major-label release after a long indie apprenticeship has a mellower feel than early fans might expect, with lots of acoustic guitar and dreamy interludes to shame "More"-era Pink Floyd, but it's no less weird than their last two efforts. Strange sounds float in and out of the mix, and Wayne Coyne's twisted hick vocals are convincingly demented. Coyne's lyrics tend toward a Dadaist stream of consciousness with occasional forays into junk culture; this is familiar modern rock territory, but songs such as "She Don't Use Jelly," "Chewin the Apple of Your Eye," and "Be My Head" are more effective and less annoying than the would-be gonzo efforts of Frank Black and Sonic Youth because they're catchier and less pretentious. The Flaming Lips may be transmitting to the satellites, but when all is said and done, they live in Oklahoma. "--Jim DeRogatis"