Artist
Stats
The Arcade Fire
Astrud Gilberto
Atmosphere
The Beach Boys
The Beatles
Ben Harper
Better Than Ezra
Bicycle
Bill Evans
Binary Star
Black Sabbath
Bob Dylan
Bob Marley & The Wailers
Bonnie 'Prince' Billy
Brendan Benson
Bright Eyes
Brother Ali
Built to Spill
Chamillionaire
Citizen Cope
Clap Your Hands Say Yeah!
Coheed and Cambria
Coldplay
Company Flow
Daft Punk
Damien Rice
Dane Cook
Death Cab for Cutie
The Decemberists
The Dismemberment Plan
Disturbed
DJ Shadow
Don Caballero
Doug Martsch
Duke Ellington With Charles Mingus & Max Roach
The Eagles
Edan
Elliot Smith
Elton John
Elvis Costello
Eminem
Eric Clapton
Eve 6
Everlast
Explosions In The Sky
Fabolous
Fatboy Slim
The Flaming Lips
Foo Fighters
Frank Sinatra and Count Basie Orchestra
Freddie Hubbard
The Game
Gnarls Barkley
Goo Goo Dolls
Good Charlotte
Gorillaz
Green Day
Harry Connick Jr
Heatmiser
Herbie Hancock
Hinder
Hootie & The Blowfish
Incubus
Insane Clown Posse
Jack Johnson
Jadakiss
Jay-Z
Jedi Mind Tricks
Jenny Lewis
John Mayer
Johnny Sketch And The Dirty Notes
Kanye West
Led Zeppelin
Lemon Jelly
Lifehouse
Lil' Wayne
Lil' Wyte
Linkin Park
Living Legends
Ludacris
Magnetic Fields
Maroon 5
Massive Attack
Matchbox 20
Mercury Rev
Michael Jackson
Miles Davis
Mindless Self Indulgence
Modest Mouse
Mos Def
My Bloody Valentine
Nas
Necro
Neutral Milk Hotel
Nico
Nightwish
Of Montreal
The Olivia Tremor Control
Outkast
Pink Floyd
Pixies
The Polyphonic Spree
Pumpkinhead
R.E.M.
Radiohead
Ray Charles
The Red Hot Chili Peppers
Rilo Kiley
The Rolling Stones
Sean Price
Semisonic
The Shins
Sigur Rós
Slowblow
The Smashing Pumpkins
Something Corporate
Soulja Slim
Sparklehorse
Stephen Malkmus
Sting
The Streets
Sublime
Survivor
Talib Kweli
Tortoise
Train
Tupac
Various Artists
The Walkmen
Weezer
Weird Al Yankovic
Wilco
The Wrens
Yo La Tengo
Young Buck
Zion I
ZZ Top
Artist: Weezer
Label: Interscope Records
Genre: Rock
Release: Jan 2002   My Rating: 0
Duration: 33:37
Summary: After taking five leisurely years to follow up on 1996's "Pinkerton", Weezer are apparently on a roll. Arriving just over 12 months after "The Green Album", "Maladroit" finds the Los Angeles power-pop band in the midst of a particularly fertile creative period. "Dope Nose," which is easily stronger than anything on the last album, flexes a sinister shout-along chorus and vintage Van Halen riffs, while the potent garage-punk blast of "Fall Together" wipes out any lingering discomfort over the thoroughly Sugar Ray-sounding "Island in the Sun." In a sense "The Green Album" was just a taster for this, the blissfully thunderous main dish. Sure, there are some deadpan emo moments ("Death and Destruction") littering the course, but mostly "Maladroit" is Weezer doing what they do best--inverting and embracing dumb rock stereotypes and somehow making them sound smart. "--Aidin Vaziri"


Artist: Weezer
Label: Geffen Records
Genre: Alternative Rock
Release: Sep 1996   My Rating: 0
Duration: 34:34
Summary: A hit single can be a bit of a mixed blessing for new bands, especially if said song gets you firmly lumped into the "novelty band" category. Such was the case with Weezer, whose runaway hit "Buddy Holly" touched a global nerve upon its release, then got on everyone's nerves after months of radio saturation. However, it did ensure that they sold millions of copies of their self-titled debut. Which is why it's so strange that their second album, "Pinkerton", was ignored. Perhaps the cold shoulder was due to the willfully noncommercial first single, "El Scorcho," which crashed and burned. Whatever the reason, "Pinkerton" soon disappeared, which is a shame because it's a great album. Whereas "Weezer" reveled in the band's geek-rock image, "Pinkerton" saw Rivers Cuomo maturing as a lyricist. From the opening, "Tired of Sex," which rants about the frustrating easiness of groupies, to the new wave pop of "Getchoo" to the epic genius of "The Good Life," there's much more diversity here than the Pixies-influenced bouncy grunge of their debut. With the closing solo, the acoustic lament "Butterfly," Cuomo demonstrates a pop mastery that promises great things from this reformed geek. "--Robert Burrow"


Artist: Weezer
Label: Geffen Records
Genre: Alternative Rock
Release: May 1994   My Rating: 0
Duration: 36:18
Summary: There's a classic episode of The Little Rascals where one of the gang can't join everybody else on the ballfield because he has to stay home with his younger brother, who has the croup. "I can't come out and play," he whines. "I've got to stay home and grease Wheezer!" Nobody at Geffen Records knows whether this was the inspiration in naming Weezer, but it makes sense. Like many of their peers, the members of the Los Angeles quartet seem to have spent their formative years in front of the TV; when they were a little older, they were just as entranced by college rock. Finally, ala the Rascals, one of the gang said, "Hey, kids, let's put on a show!," and the result is Weezer's uplifting, unpretentious, and extremely endearing debut.
The self-titled "Weezer" is lean and mean at 10 short, punchy tunes, but nearly every one is powered by a larger-than-life chorus or a simple but effective lyric. "Undone-The Sweater Song" uses an unraveling sweater as a metaphor for a relationship on the rocks; "Buddy Holly" pays heartfelt tribute to the '50s rocker, and "In the Garage" paints a scene of suburban teens jamming while surrounded by posters of Kiss. Producer Ric Ocasek of Cars fame pushes the vocals and rhythm guitars, and this bare-bones approach may earn comparisons to fellow garage-pop band Green Day. But Weezer has more in common with the late, lamented Big Dipper, another group of slacker wiseguys that you just had to love. --"Jim DeRogatis"



Artist: Weezer
Label: Interscope Records
Genre: Alternative Rock
Release: May 2001   My Rating: 0
Duration: 30:36
Summary: Weezer, those geek rockers who topped mid-'90s charts with those oh-so-precious pop fables "Undone (The Sweater Song)" and "Buddy Holly," were almost undone by 1997's bombastic "Pinkerton". Their sophomore release turned its back on the band's clean-cut debut, with a thrash approach more influenced by Sabbath and Kiss than the Beach Boys. On their third album (self-titled, like their first, but referred to as the "Green Album"), the band makes a concentrated effort to return to anthemic '60s punky pop, demonstrating that, for Weezer at least, it's rather easy being green. In fact, one could say they're almost as green as Green Day, especially on "Knockdown Dragout." At their best, Weezer show such boundless energy and gleeful aplomb that you'd swear you were listening to a lost Badfinger album. Conversely, Rivers Cuomo's twisted genius makes its way onto the anxious and paranoid "Hash Pipe" and the jittery "Glorious Days," making the "Green Album" the most absorbing and rounded vision from these pop masters yet. "--Jaan Uhelszki"